agario - slitherio unblocked - diep.io unblocked - agario unblocked - yohoho unblocked - yohoho + among us unblocked + agario unblocked agario - slitherio unblocked - diep.io unblocked - agario unblocked - yohoho unblocked - yohoho

Become A Member

Support Us

 

Calendar

Boston Children’s Museum
308 Congress Street
Boston, MA 02210
(617) 426-6500
 

  Get Directions Here

Wednesday - Sunday
2 time slots,
9:00am - 12:00pm and 1:30pm - 4:30pm

California Baskets

Boston Children’s Museum possesses an astounding collection of Native American cultural artifacts from across the United States, which includes clothing, tools, religious objects, and toys. The Museum’s collection of Native American basketry from California consists of nearly 100 baskets and cultural objects representing the Klamath, Mono, and Pomo Nations of Northern California as well as the Diegueño, Kiliwa, Luiseno, and Cahuilla Nations of Southern California. All of the baskets in the collection are distinctive and remarkable examples of basketry weaving as fine-art and double as containers for storage, to transport goods and food, religious ceremonies, and play.

There are two variations of weaving prevalent among Native California Indian basketry - coiling and twining. Both processes include wrapping flexible plant fibers around a stiff plant-based structure. Throughout history, weavers have not received formal training, but rather tribal traditions surrounding basket weaving have been passed down from generation to generation. Native basket weavers developed diverse patterns and motifs on the sides of their baskets. Many common designs and symbols are present across generations and among interacting tribes, but some symbols have been found to be specific to the individual maker – like an artist’s signature. Available materials for weaving each basket were dependent on the plants native to the area and the particular time of year. Basket weaving is a time intensive process requiring patience. In some cases, it took many months to gather and prepare the raw materials in addition to the many months it took to weave the basket.

By the late 19th century, Western culture began to permeate Native American culture. Modern storage structures replaced the need for baskets to hold and cook food and plant fibers and bone for tools were exchanged for cotton thread and metal. At this same time, Native-made baskets became increasingly desirable in non-Native homes for decorative purposes. This proved to be lucrative for many weavers; selling one basket could earn the equivalent of one month of wages doing labor. The increased interest and commercial consumption of the Native American culture by non-Natives continued into the beginning of the 20th century. Records and ephemera at BCM indicate some of the Native baskets were purchased during this time period and then later donated to the Museum. The baskets shows here primarily entered the Museum’s collection in the 1940s with the earliest arriving in 1917.

Kolin Perry was the Elvira Growdon Intern for Collections Management and Curatorial Practice in fall 2017. Kolin received his BA in Art History and BFA in Photography from Lesley University in 2016. In May 2018 he completed an M.Ed Teacher of Visual Art Education degree at Lesley. Kolin has previously worked at Boston Children’s Museum as an art programming intern and a visitor experience associate.

Bibliography
Carr, Christopher, and Jill E. Neitzel. Style, Society, and Person: Archaeological and Ethnological Perspectives. NY, NY: Springer Science Business Media, LLC, 2013.

Dockstader, Frederick J. Indian Art in North America: Arts and Crafts. Greenwich, CT: New York Graphic Society, 1973.

Glueck, Grace. "DESIGN REVIEW; Pomo Indian Basketry: Window Into a Culture." The New York Times. May 21, 1999. Accessed April 02, 2018. https://www.nytimes.com/1999/05/21/arts/design-review-pomo-indian-basket....

Hedges, Ken. Fibers & Forms: Native American Basketry of the West. San Diego, CA: San Diego Museum of Man, 1997.

Kroeber, A. L. Basketry Designs of the Mission Indians. New York: American Museum of Natural History, 1932.

Nah Tah Wahsh, Michelle. "Pomo Basket." Pomo Basket. Accessed April 02, 2018. http://www.nmai.si.edu/exhibitions/all_roads_are_good/PomoBasket.htm.

Pomo Basketweavers: A Tribute to Three Elders. Directed by David Ludwig. United States: Creative Light Productions, 1994. Accessed March 02, 2018. https://search.alexanderstreet.com/view/work/bibliographic_entity|video_work|3239207?utm_source=aspresolver&utm_medium=MARC&utm_campaign=AlexanderStreet.

Purdy, Carl. "Pomo Indian Baskets." Out West Magazine 16 (January 1902): 15. Accessed March 02, 2018. https://books.google.com/books?id=jWoLAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=ka-hu....

Browse the collection:

Coiled basket, 8 ½” diameter

Coiled basket, 8 ½” diameter

Yokuts Tribes, central California; Date unknown

Plant fiber

Gift of Mrs. G.R. Whitten, 1954

INS 1038 S1

Coiled basket, 8” diameter

Coiled basket, 8” diameter

Diegueño (Kumeyaay), southern California and northern Mexico; Date unknown

Plant fiber

Gift of Miss Mary V. Thayer, 1949

INS 1415

Coiled basket, 4 ¾” diameter

Coiled basket, 4 ¾” diameter

Mission Indians, southern California; Date unknown

Plant fiber

Gift of Miss Mary Eustis, 1940

INS 986 S3

Miniature twined basket, 2” long

Miniature twined basket, 2” long

Pomo Indians, northern California; Date unknown

Plant fiber, glass beads

Gift of Miss Mary Eustis, 1940

INS 986 S7

Basket, 10” diameter

Basket, 10” diameter

Indigenous Peoples of Pit River region of California; Date unknown

Plant fiber

Gift in memory of C. Alice Baker by Miss Emma L. Coleman, 1933

INS 679

Basketry hat, 7” diameter

Basketry hat, 7” diameter

Klamath Tribes, Klamath River Valley, northern California or southern Oregon; Date Unknown

Plant fiber

Gift of Miss Marguarite Souther, 1941

INS 731

Basketry hat, 7” diameter

Basketry hat, 7” diameter

Klamath Tribes, Klamath River Valley, northern California or southern Oregon; Date unknown

Plant fiber

Gift of Mr. Ira S. Reed, 1951

INS 1491 S7

Coiled “jewel” basket, 1 ½” diameter

Coiled “jewel” basket, 1 ½” diameter

Pomo Indians, northern California; Date unknown

Plant fiber, feathers, shells

Gift of the Hubbard Family, 1917

INS 29

Coiled basket, 3 ½” diameter

Coiled basket, 3 ½” diameter

Pomo Indians, northern California; Date unknown

Plant fiber, glass beads, shells

Early gift to Boston Children’s Museum, donor unknown

INS 26

Tray, 10 ¾” diameter

Tray, 10 ¾” diameter

Pomo Indians, northern California; c. 1908

Plant fiber

Donor unknown, found in collection

INS XX 13

Strainer, 15 5/8” diameter

Strainer, 15 5/8” diameter

Pomo Indians, northern California; date unknown

Wood, plant fiber

Gift of Mrs. George R. Beardsell, 1941

INS 1107

Plentiful Weekday & Weekend Discounted Parking Available